The influence of the Pringle maneuver in laparoscopic hepatectomy: continuous monitor of hemodynamic change can predict the perioperatively physiological reservation

Yi Chan Chen, Min Hsuan Lee, Shan Ni Hsueh, Chien Liang Liu, Chung Kun Hui, Ruey Shyang Soong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Importance: This is the first study to investigate the correlation between intra-operative hemodynamic changes and postoperative physiological status. Design, settings, and participants: Objective: Patients receiving laparoscopic hepatectomy were routinely monitored using FloTract for goal-directed fluid management. The Pringle maneuver was routinely performed during parenchymal dissection and the hemodynamic changes were prospectively recorded. We retrospectively analyzed the continuous hemodynamic data from FloTrac to compare with postoperative physiological outcomes. Exposure: The Pringle maneuver during laparoscopic hepatectomy. Results: Main outcome(s) and measure(s): Stroke volume variation that did not recover from the relief of the Pringle maneuver during the last application of Pringle maneuver predicted elevated postoperative MELD-Na scores. Conclusions and relevance: The complexity of the hemodynamic data recorded by the FloTrac system during the Pringle Maneuver in laparoscopic hepatectomy can be effectively analyzed using the growth mixture modeling (GMM) method. The results can potentially predict the risk of short-term liver function deterioration.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1042516
JournalFrontiers in Big Data
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Keywords

  • FloTrac
  • goal directed fluid management
  • hepatocellular carcinoma
  • laparoscopic hepatectomy
  • Pringle maneuver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Information Systems
  • Artificial Intelligence

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