Risk factors of postoperative hydrocephalus following decompressive craniectomy for spontaneous intracranial hemorrhages and intraventricular hemorrhage

Yi Chieh Wu, Hsiang Chih Liao, Jang Chun Lin, Yu Ching Chou, Da Tong Ju, Dueng Yuan Hueng, Chi Tun Tang, Kuan Yin Tseng, Kuan Nien Chou, Bon Jour Lin, Shao Wei Feng, Yi An Chen, Ming Hsuan Chung, Peng Wei Wang, Wei Hsiu Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Hydrocephalus is a complication of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage; however, its predictive relationship with hydrocephalus in this patient cohort is not understood. Here, we evaluated the incidence and risk factors of hydrocephalus after craniectomy. Methods: Retrospectively studied data from 39 patients in the same hospital from 2016/01 to 2020/12 and analyzed risk factors for hydrocephalus. The clinical data recorded included patient age, sex, timing of surgery, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) score, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, medical comorbidity, and blood data. Predictors of patient outcomes were determined using Student t test, chi-square test, and logistic regression. Results: We recruited 39 patients with cerebral herniation who underwent craniectomy for spontaneous supratentorial hemorrhage. Persistent hydrocephalus was observed in 17 patients. The development of hydrocephalus was significantly associated with the timing of operation, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption according to the Student t test and chi-square test. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that postoperative hydrocephalus was significantly associated with the timing of surgery (P = .031) and cigarette smoking (P = .041). Discussion: The incidence of hydrocephalus in patients who underwent delayed operation (more than 4 hours) was lower than that in patients who underwent an operation after less than 4 hours. nonsmoking groups also have lower incidence of hydrocephalus. Among patients who suffered from spontaneous supratentorial hemorrhage and need to receive emergent craniectomy, physicians should be reminded that postoperative hydrocephalus followed by ventriculoperitoneal shunting may be necessary in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E31086
JournalMedicine (United States)
Volume101
Issue number41
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 14 2022

Keywords

  • decompressive craniectomy
  • postoperative hydrocephalus
  • spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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