Risk factors and clinical outcomes of ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients on the liver transplant waiting list

C. H. Cheng, C. F. Lee, R. S. Soong, T. H. Wu, K. M. Chan, H. S. Chou, T. J. Wu, M. C. Yu, W. C. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Prolonged intubation results in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), which contributes to significant mortality among patients on the waiting list. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for and clinical outcomes of VAP among patients into the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: We enrolled 50 consecutive critically ill patients with end-stage liver disease admitted to the ICU from January 2005 through December 2010. All patients were intubated for more than 4 days; no definite infection was found initially. We evaluated potential risks factors for VAP and clinical outcomes. Results: Smoking, underlying liver disease, and lobar focal consolidations were significant factors for patients with versus without VAP. Fourteen-day mortality rates were 61.5% for VAP versus 40.5% for patients without VAP. Twenty-eight-day mortality rates for both groups were 92.3% and 86.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to identify independent predictors of early 14-day mortality. Conclusions: Underlying liver disease and lobar focal consolidations were risks factors for VAP in patients with prolonged intubation. Patients with prolonged intubation have a dismal prognosis even without VAP. The clinical outcomes of patients with versus without VAP were similar. However, early liver transplantation (<14 days of intubation) improves the chance to rescue patients before development of VAP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)762-764
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

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