Insomnia complaints correlated with higher risk of cognitive impairment in older adults following stroke: a National Representative Comparison Study

Wei Liang, Dean Wu, Yeu Hui Chuang, Yen Chun Fan, Hsiao Yean Chiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although associations among insomnia, cognitive impairment, and stroke have been demonstrated, whether insomnia increases the risk of cognitive impairment after stroke remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine whether insomnia complaints moderated the association between stroke and cognitive impairment in older adults. This study was a secondary data analysis that used data from the National Health Interview Survey 2009. A total of 447 older adults with a mean age of 74.63 years (50.1% men) were included. Self-reported insomnia and stroke occurrence were determined using a questionnaire. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination. We used multivariate logistic regression to analyze the association between insomnia complaints and cognitive impairment. Participants were categorized into four groups: those with stroke and insomnia (58), those with stroke without insomnia (91), those without stroke with insomnia (116), and those without stroke or insomnia (182). The prevalence of insomnia complaints was 38.9%, and the frequency of poststroke cognitive impairment was 50.3%. After controlling for potential confounders, participants with stroke (with or without insomnia) had a significantly higher risk of cognitive impairment than those without stroke or insomnia (adjusted odds ratios: 4.16 and 2.91, 95% confidence intervals: 1.91–9.07 and 1.56–5.43, respectively). Stroke with or without insomnia complaints was associated with a higher risk of cognitive impairment relative to older adults without stroke or insomnia. The risk of cognitive impairment was the highest among participants with both stroke and insomnia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-47
Number of pages7
JournalSleep and Biological Rhythms
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Insomnia
  • Older adults
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

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