High O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase expression predicts poor survival in patients with early stage lung adenocarcinoma

Yi Cheng Lin, Chia Hung Lin, Yi Chen Yeh, Hsiang Ling Ho, Yu Chung Wu, Mei Yu Chen, Teh Ying Chou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tumor cell heterogeneity can make selection of appropriate interventions to lung cancer a challenge. Novel biomarkers predictive of disease risk and treatment response are needed to improve personalized treatment strategies. O-GlcNAcylation, the attachment of β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) to serine or threonine residues of intracellular proteins, modulates protein functions and is implicated in cancer pathogenesis. O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) catalyze O-GlcNAc addition and removal, respectively. We used immunohistochemistry to explore the utility of OGT, OGA, and O-GlcNAc as potential biomarkers for lung adenocarcinoma. We found that high OGT expression is associated with poor overall survival (OS) in both stage I patients (P=0.032) and those at variable stages of disease (P=0.029), and with poor recurrence-free survival (RFS) in stage I patients (P=0.035). High OGT expression is also associated with poorer OS in patients with EGFR wild-type tumors at variable stages (P=0.038). Multivariate analysis indicated that OGT expression is an independent prognostic factor for RFS (HR 2.946, 95% CI: 1.411-6.150, P=0.004) and OS (HR 2.002, 95% CI: 1.183-3.391, P=0.010) in stage I patients. Our findings indicate OGT is a promising biomarker for further classifying early stage lung adenocarcinomas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31032-31044
Number of pages13
JournalOncotarget
Volume9
Issue number57
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • EGFR
  • Lung cancer
  • O-GlcNAcylation
  • OGT
  • Prognostic marker

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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