Comparison of the Associations between Self-Reported Sleep Quality and Sleep Duration Concerning the Risk of Depression: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Indonesia

Vivi Leona Amelia, Hsiu-Ju Jen, Tso-Ying Lee, Li-Fang Chang, Min-Huey Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is substantial evidence that a lack of sleep quality and duration can increase the risk of depression in adults. Still, few studies have compared sleep quality and duration to the risk of depression in Indonesia. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the prevalence and risk of depression associated with both sleep quality and duration and identified those factors associated with sleep quality with sleep duration. This study was a cross-sectional study, and the data were obtained from the 2014 Indonesian Family Life Survey, with a total sample comprised of 19,675 respondents aged older than 15 years old. A self-reported questionnaire was used to assess sleep quality and duration. Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CESD-10) questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to examine the risk of depression, and multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the risk of poor sleep quality with consideration to sleep duration. The prevalence of depression was the highest in the poor sleep quality and long sleep duration groups (48.5%). After all variables associated with depression were adjusted, poor sleep quality was identified as a factor leading to a higher risk of depression (OR = 4.2; 95% CI: 3.7-4.6; p < 0.001) than long sleep duration (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.6; p < 0.001). Furthermore, the interaction between poor sleep quality and long sleep duration gave the highest risk of depression (OR = 4.4; 95% CI: 3.6-5.3); p < 0.001). Multinomial logistic regression revealed that the factors leading to a significant increase in the risk of poor sleep quality, with consideration to sleep duration, in the population were age, gender, marital status, education, wealth index, physical activity, chronic illness, season, and urban area (p < 0.05). Sleep quality was found to be associated with a higher risk of depression than sleep duration. The findings of this study may be beneficial to healthcare professionals who develop health promotion strategies for reducing the incidence of depression in communities.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume19
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2022

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Humans
  • Aged
  • Adolescent
  • Self Report
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Indonesia/epidemiology
  • Depression/epidemiology
  • Sleep Quality
  • Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
  • Sleep

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Comparison of the Associations between Self-Reported Sleep Quality and Sleep Duration Concerning the Risk of Depression: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Indonesia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this