Body Mass Index Asian populations category and stroke and heart disease in the adult population: a longitudinal study of the Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS) 2007 and 2014

Kamaluddin Latief, Dieta Nurrika, Min Kuang Tsai, Wayne Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A substantially elevated Body Mass Index (BMI) is one of the largest global modifiable risk factors for stroke and heart diseases. Most studies classify BMI according to the WHO BMI cut-off point in stroke and heart disease studies. However, there is a limited understanding of the association between the BMI cut-off point in the Asian population category and stroke and heart disease. This study aimed to investigate the incidence rate ratio of stroke and heart disease by BMI categories for the Asian population. Methods: A 7-year prospective longitudinal study (2007–2014) was conducted on 6,688 adult Indonesian individuals (≥ 35 years) residing across 13 different provinces in Indonesia during the survey periods. Data on BMI were collected in 2007. Information on stroke and heart disease was obtained in both 2007 and in 2014. A multivariate-adjusted Poisson regression model was used to estimate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of either stroke or heart disease or both stroke and heart disease by BMI. Results: Among the 6,688 eligible participants, 334 (5%) were judged as stroke and heart disease in 2014. The IRR (95% CI) of stroke and heart disease for participants with obesity was 2.57 (1.64–4.04) compared with those within normal weight. This incidence rate ratio was more pronounced among middle-aged adults (< 55 years) rather than the older adults (≥55 years).The IRR of stroke and heart disease among obese middle-aged adults was 4.18 (95% CI 2.10–8.31). Conclusions: An association was observed between obesity and the risk of stroke and heart disease, especially in middle-aged adults. These findings suggest that lowering BMI through the adoption of healthy dietary habits and increasing physical activity, particularly among middle-aged adults with high education, occupational employment, and residence in either urban or rural areas, may be beneficial for preventing stroke and heart disease.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2221
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Body Mass
  • Cardiac Disease
  • Heart disorder
  • Index
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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