Attitudes toward active aging and their association with social determinants and views on older adults in Japan: a cross-sectional study

Eri Osawa, Yuri Sasaki, Hui Chuan Hsu, Hiroko Miura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Globally, the population of older adults has greatly increased, and active aging—whereby older adults can live healthy and fulfilling lives—is considered crucial for a sustainable society. However, the concept and practice of active aging are highly debated because it is unclear how people perceive active aging. This study explored Japanese people’s attitudes toward active aging (ATAA) and examined the associations between ATAA scores and sociodemographic variables, views on older adults, and self-rated life and health. Methods: This study used data obtained from an online survey that originally targeted adults of all generations in Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan. In this study, we used only data from Japanese participants to elaborate on factors associated with ATAA in Japan. We conducted a one-way analysis of variance test and multiple linear regression analysis to evaluate the associations between the ATAA scores of 506 Japanese individuals and sociodemographic variables, views on older adults, and self-rated life and health. Results: The sample comprised 171 females and 335 males. The mean (± SD) ATAA score of the 506 respondents was 138.8 (± 20.80). Females had a significantly higher ATAA score than males (144.02 versus 136.13, F = 26.29, p < 0.001). The respondents with higher education attainment, religious beliefs, better views on older adults, and better self-rated health were more likely to have a positive ATAA score (B: 3.83, 95% CI: 0.11, 7.56; B: 4.31, 95% CI: 0.93, 7.69; B: 2.07, 95% CI: 1.61, 2.53; B: 2.87, 95% CI: 0.92, 4.82, respectively). Being male, single (i.e., never married, divorced, or widowed) and other non-married marital statuses, and satisfied with one’s financial condition were negatively associated with ATAA (B: -8.73, 95% CI: -12.49, -4.96; B: -5.47, 95% CI: -9.07, -1.86; B: -2.04, 95% CI: -3.99, -0.09, respectively). Conclusions: This study identified that females have more positive ATAA than males. Better views on older adults are a possible contributing factor that promotes ATAA among Japanese people. Our findings provide useful evidence that an approach towards those who are male, single, and economically satisfied is needed so that they have a positive attitude toward aging in Japan. It is necessary to address ageism and develop an environment in which individuals can expect to age actively.

Original languageEnglish
Article number140
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2024

Keywords

  • Active aging
  • Attitude
  • Japan
  • Views on older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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