Association between Depression, Antidepression Medications, and the Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan

Yi Jen Fang, Tien Yuan Wu, Jung Nien Lai, Cheng Li Lin, Ni Tien, Yun Ping Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between depression, antidepressant medications (ADMs), and the risk of subsequent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) development remains controversial. Thus, we investigated this aspect by a population-based retrospective cohort study using the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 available in Taiwan. This large, observational study included 46,201 patients with depression and a 1: 1 age- and sex-matched nondepression cohort enrolled between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013, and the newly diagnosed T2DM incidence rates were determined. We estimated the effects of depression on T2DM and the cumulative incidence curves by Cox proportional regression hazard models and Kaplan-Meier methods, respectively. We found that 47.97% of the patients with depression did not receive ADM. Among patients with depression who received ADM, 29.71%, 6.29%, 0.05%, 9.65%, and 6.32% received selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), heterocyclic antidepressants, and other medications, respectively. Patients without ADM treatment had a 39% higher risk of developing T2DM. However, those who received ADM treatment had a significantly lower risk of T2DM development in every treatment category. Depressive disorder treated with ADMs, especially with long-term use, was associated with an 11-48% decrease in the risk of T2DM in all ADM groups; however, heterocyclic antidepressant treatment for shorter periods (<80 days) was not significantly associated with a decreased risk of T2DM. The incidence of T2DM in Taiwan was found to be associated with an a priori history of depression and was inversely correlated with ADM treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8857230
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Biochemistry,Genetics and Molecular Biology
  • General Immunology and Microbiology

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