Analysis of erythrocyte C4d to complement receptor 1 ratio: Use in distinguishing between infection and flare-up in febrile patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

Chen Hung Chen, Shun Ban Tai, Hsiang Cheng Chen, Deng Ho Yang, Ming Yieh Peng, Yuh Feng Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Fever in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be caused by infection or flare-up of the disease. This study aimed to determine whether the ratio of the level of erythrocyte-bound C4d to that of complement receptor 1 (C4d/CR1) can serve as a useful biomarker in the differentiation between infection and flare-up in febrile SLE patients. Methods. We enrolled febrile SLE patients and determined the ratio on the day of admission. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the subsequent clinical course. Results. Among the febrile SLE patients, those with flare-up had higher ratios and lower C-reactive protein (CRP) levels than those with infection. Cut-off values of <1.2447 and >4.67 for C4d/CR1 ratio and CRP, respectively, were 40.91% sensitive and 100.0% specific for the presence of infection in febrile SLE patients; similarly, cut-off values of >1.2447 and <2.2, respectively, were 80% sensitive and 100% specific for the absence of infection in febrile SLE patients. Conclusion. The C4d/CR1 ratio is a simple and quickly determinable biomarker that enables the differentiation between infection and flare-up in febrile SLE patients at initial evaluation. Further, when combined with the CRP level, it is useful to evaluate disease activity in SLE patients with infection.

Original languageEnglish
Article number939783
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Immunology and Microbiology
  • General Biochemistry,Genetics and Molecular Biology

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