A role for chronic parvovirus B19 infection in liver dysfunction in renal transplant recipients?

Po Chang Lee, Chung Jye Hung, Yih Jyh Lin, Jen Ren Wang, Ming Shiou Jan, Huan Yao Lei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Clinically, liver dysfunction in renal transplant recipients is related to hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The contribution of parvovirus B19 (B19) to liver disease in renal transplant recipients has not been studied. Here we present the association of liver dysfunction with or without the coinfection of B19, HBV, and HCV after renal transplantation. Methods. We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to identify B19, HBV, and HCV infections in serum samples taken from 144 renal transplant recipients before transplantation and at 12 and 24 months after transplantation. After each patient had fasted for 12 hr, blood was taken for measurement of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase monthly for at least 6 months. Results. Liver dysfunction developed at the significantly higher incidence of 47% in the anti-HCV(+) patients compared with 6% in the noninfected group (P<0.0001). HBV infection had no impact on the incidence of liver dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. A higher incidence of liver dysfunction was found in 42% of B19 IgG(+)IgM(-) group patients compared with 13% of the B19 IgG(+)IgM(+) group (P=0.0051) and 9.5% of the B19 IgG(-)IgM(-) group (P=0.0003). A B19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay revealed significantly higher liver dysfunction in 29% of B19 PCR(+) group patients compared with 13.6% of B19 PCR(-) patients (P=0.0419). Patients who were anti-HCV(+) and B19 PCR(+) had a significantly higher incidence of liver dysfunction than B19 PCR(-) patients (P=0.002). Conclusions. Chronic B19 infection and HCV infection, both separately and in combination, increase the incidence of liver dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. HBV infection does not seem to be independently or synergistically associated with liver dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1635-1639
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation
Volume73
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 27 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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